Wednesday, 5 April 2017

JO: I DON'T FIT IN...

It's problem page time on DREAMCATCHER, and reader Jo has a dilemma for HONEY TANBERRY to solve... will you agree with her verdict?

Jo says:
This is going to sound arrogant, but I am not arrogant and I don't think I am 'better' than anyone else, I promise, it is just that I really, really don't fit in here. My school is not a good one, the teachers are stressed and change all the time and when you are being taught by supply teachers everyone messes about and you can't learn. You have to tread carefully so as not to be bullied and although I have a couple of friends, I don't think they 'get' me at all. My family are struggling and my dad is unemployed at the moment, my mum working nights. We live on a rough estate and my little brother is going off the rails, involved with a gang of kids who are always in trouble. I cry myself to sleep at night because I don't want this life, I don't belong here. I get good grades at school and I dream of going to university to be a doctor, but the way the science teaching is at my school I don't think I stand a chance of getting the marks I need. Nobody seems to care about the future, but it's the only thing I have to hold on to... a way out of a life I hate.

Honey says:
Whoa. I understand that feeling of not fitting in and wanting something different, that sense that family and friends don't understand you. In fact, I didn't know how lucky I was, but things are tougher for you, I can see that. Let's look at each issue. Your school is struggling, and if you want the kind of grades that will take you to uni to study medicine, that's not good enough. Are there other schools locally with better reputations that could take you? Changing schools is not easy, but could make a huge difference to how you are feeling. Talk to your parents - present your reasons logically and have suggestions and plans in place. They want what is best for you, no matter how stressed they may be themselves. If a new school is not an option at this point, don't panic - work hard and research good Sixth Forms for after GCSE stage. This is a point where many students switch school/ college and it is exactly the point where you need good teachers. Your dream is possible, I promise! Your dad will hopefully get work again and your mum may be able to choose better hours, but meanwhile let them know how worried you are about your brother. It sounds as though he is looking for by choosing to be a part of the gang, but with family support he may think again. Talk to your parents, brother and friends - even to supportive teachers - you may find they understand you more than you suppose. When life is difficult, knowing that others are looking out for you can make all the difference. As for that dream - hang on tightly, and do everything you can to make it happen.

Cathy says:
Great advice from Honey for a very challenging problem... what would YOU add? COMMENT BELOW to have your say!

2 comments:

  1. Talk to one of your parents as soon as possible, and work the hardest you can-never give up on that dream of yours! get your parents to go in to school and talk to the headteacher to discuss the way the things are taught at the school, and possibly to your science teacher too. Good luck!You'll get through this!

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  2. I understand how Jo feels. Within, this tough world comes a difficulty in finding work, disruptive students who do not want to succeed in life and bad influenced gangs, bad reputation as well as an odd couple of teachers who are unable to control a class of 30. I agree with so and so when they say to research further, extend your learning. Also, if possible ask your good teachers to help you with work maybe during Lunch, after class, after school etc,etc. Also, keeping a diary may help you to digest everything happening in your life. I know this information is overdue but I hope it helps anyone else in this situation that stumbles across this.

    #sweetreats xx

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